MVP Vibes


This is my Fifth blog post as part of the series of articles I am writing called MVP Vibes”. 

MVP Program by Salesforce include so many benefits, where it sounds so awesome, becoming MVP is not that easy, it takes continues contribution in Salesforce Community and real-time efforts.

Salesforce MVP is the one who guides community and recognizes for their Passion, Integrity, Knowledge, Courage, Vision, and Awesomeness.

Today I am introducing one of our new WINTER 2017 MVP

Fabrice Cathala

Salesforce MVP | 9x Salesforce Certified | #BaldForce | Thames Valley Developer Group Co-Leader

 

Fabrice cathala

 

How did you start your Journey?

My first contact with Salesforce was Symantec’s global roll-out in 2005. My first contact with the community was a year later when I joined a group of people and co-founded the first user group in Europe: the London User Group.

Fast forward to 2013 when I joined the London developer group. The organisers were so friendly that not only did I come back every month to learn more but I also developed new friendships which were important to me considering that I had left my friends in France. Then, in 2015, Antonina Romanova was looking for help to start a new DG in Reading, and I jumped in as a way to give back to the community.

How do you feel?

First of all, being named an MVP was a huge and pleasant surprise for me. I’ll always remember, receiving this email from Holly Firestone on February the 28th, 2017…

Now that the news has sunk in, I still find it humbling to be part of a family of such talented individuals. It’s also a little pressuring because you naturally feel compelled to rise to the challenge of honouring your fellow MVPs.

What have you been working on?

You (Nitin Gupta) certainly are aware, since you’re part of the core team with Meighan Brodkey but, for your readers, I’m launching a community driven initiative to improve the Change Sets.

There are two parts of it:

Phase 1 is about reducing the number of manual tasks when deploying with change sets. This phase is crowdsourced.

Phase 2 is about improving the user interface essentially based on high-scorer ideas found in the IdeaExchange.

Phase 1 is currently live, and anybody can join the success community to help us listing the configuration tasks that can’t be deployed via Change Set. Manual tasks are not only a burden but also a risk of misconfiguration in Production. When done with this list, we’ll share it with Salesforce.

When you first got involved in Community?

As I said, I first got involved in 2005, but actually started to put my weight on it ten years later! That was the time when I repurposed my Cloud Computing blog to focus on Salesforce (https://saas-components.com), I co-organised the Developer Group in Reading in the UK (https://www.meetup.com/Thames-Valley-Salesforce-Developers/) and started public speaking gigs (https://www.slideshare.net/fcathala).

I have to say that I was inspired in multiple ways by some of the community champions that I consider today as my roles models: Keir Bowden aka Bob Buzzard, Mike Gerhold, Wes Nolte, Jeff Douglas and Steve Molis aka SteveMo.

What do you find most challenging after becoming MVP?

Things are not more challenging after becoming an MVP. In the opposite, I’d say they’re getting easier since doors tend to open quicker. It’s just that you get more requests for help of all sorts, AppExchange reviews and so on. It’s fine since MVPs are a helpful bunch by definition, but you need to manage your time and avoid spreading yourself too thin.

What can Community Expect from their MVP?

I’m preparing a presentation for India Dreamin held in Noida on Saturday, September the 30th (http://www.indiadreamin.in/). I also have a new interest in WIT and equality in the workplace. I was lucky to have a great clarification of the topic by Louise Lockie at Dreamforce 16 and am now raring to help one way or the other. I’m researching what should that way be…

I Hope you liked my blog post as part of the series of articles I am writing called MVP Vibes.

In case you missed the first blog:

In case you missed the second blog:

In case you missed the third blog:

In case you missed the Fourth blog:

If you also want to share your experience with Salesforce Community, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

If you like my Blog, please share it on Facebook and Twitter.

I will be introducing other ambassadors soon and will be sharing their stories too.

 

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MVP Vibes


This is my Fourth blog post as part of the series of articles I am writing called MVP Vibes”. 

MVP Program by Salesforce include so many benefits, where it sounds so awesome, becoming MVP is not that easy, it takes continues contribution in Salesforce Community and real-time efforts.

Salesforce MVP is the one who guides community and recognizes for their Passion, Integrity, Knowledge, Courage, Vision, and Awesomeness.

Today I am introducing one of our new WINTER 2017 MVP

Ohad Idan

Salesforce MVP | 5x Salesforce Certified | NYC Developer User group Leader

 

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How did you start your Journey?

My name is Ohad Idan and I’ve been a Salesforce aficionado since late 2010.

I started, like so many others, as an accidental administrator when my boss handed me off the keys to the company’s Salesforce Org without neither him or I knowing what it is.

I quickly realized the potential to impact our company and started to teach myself how to get the most out of the platform, and when I reached the end of the declarative capabilities, started to teach myself to code.

I was able to single-handedly drive tremendous business impact by using Salesforce to automate so many of the company’s manual processes – which is a testament to the power this platform holds.

The local Salesforce community in NYC was a phenomenal tool for me to network, learn, and interact with others, and a few years ago I joined the leadership of the NYC Developer User Group.

How do you feel?

I was surprised and extremely honored to be named an MVP. I’ve always enjoyed contributing to the local and online community. The sense of satisfaction I get by helping people reach new places in their journey is extremely fulfilling, so I never really expected to get anything beyond that.

To me, being an MVP doesn’t mean that I’m in any way special, since there are so many others in the community who contribute their knowledge and time. To me it’s just a spotlight that allows members of the community to identify some users who have helped others in the past and that they should feel comfortable enough reaching out to with questions.

What have you been working on?

The timing of my MVP nomination was crazy, I received my MVP in March, and just a month later, in April of 2017, I started my own consulting company. I’ve been working on creating relationships with new customers, and starting to build what I hope will one day become a prominent Salesforce consulting company. It’s been a wild ride already!

I am planning to start cranking up more certifications (I only have 5) in the next few months.

 

When you first got involved in Community?

I got involved in the NYC Community a few months after I started administrating Salesforce. I used to come to the morning sessions that the NYC User Group had. I honestly had no idea what I would learn there when I first started coming, and I knew no-one. It didn’t take long to start making friends, though.

I just wanted to learn what others are doing, how they are doing it… figure out what I don’t know that I don’t know. The community meetups were a great place for that. There was always someone sharing something they’ve done, and I always came back to work with a bunch of new ideas to try out.

On the User-group side, Cheryl Feldman has always been an unstoppable force, kind, friendly, and happy to help in any way she can. On the Developer User Group, Luke Cushanick has been guiding me and helping me grow as a developer and as a member (and later a leader) of the community.

What do you find most challenging after becoming MVP?

I’m not really sure how to answer this question… My biggest challenge has been keeping up with all of my existing commitments while working on creating and establishing my new business.

It’s easy for me to contribute when I’m at a UG Meetup or any Salesforce event, but it’s been harder to find time to contribute online.

What can Community Expect from their MVP?

The local community is where I shine. I love the face-to-face conversations, getting to know local Salesforce users or developers, talking to them about their journey, and helping when asked. I will always be at any UG Meetup that I can join, and will always continue to contribute.

Over the next couple of months I plan to redirect a lot of my energy back to my blog. It was a lot of fun when I started it, but once I started my business it was hard to keep writing – I want to get back to that.

I Hope you liked my blog post as part of the series of articles I am writing called MVP Vibes.

In case you missed the first blog:

In case you missed the second blog:

In case you missed the third blog:

If you also want to share your experience with Salesforce Community, please contact me.

If you like my Blog, please share it on Facebook and Twitter.

I will be introducing other ambassadors soon and will be sharing their stories too.

 

 

 

 

MVP Vibes


This is my Third blog post as part of the series of articles I am writing called MVP Vibes”. 

MVP Program by Salesforce include so many benefits, where it sounds so awesome, becoming MVP is not that easy, it takes continues contribution in Salesforce Community and real-time efforts.

Salesforce MVP is the one who guides community and recognizes for their Passion, Integrity, Knowledge, Courage, Vision, and Awesomeness.

Today I am introducing one of our new WINTER 2017 MVP

Justin Barss

Salesforce MVP | Non-Profit Technologist Cheerleader & Coach

 

Justin

 

 

How did you start your Journey?

The experience of “community” has been the water I have swum in since I graduated college and started my first internship at an urban ministry – living in the cross-cultural community providing services to youth and families in Wilmington, Delaware.  Through several community connections, this organization began using Salesforce in 2010 and I was offered the job to import our Donor and Volunteer information and grow it there.  It was one-quarter of my job at the time (like most nonprofit staff) but I loved the idea of Salesforce and building my own ways to measure and track important data.  Since then, I’ve helped build apps for legal tech, have done my own independent consulting, and finally, have found a home at Now IT Matters for the last four years.  I have grown incredibly through my positions there and love the constant challenge of finding ways to help clients and nonprofits leverage Salesforce to fulfill their mission.

How do you feel?

I was honestly surprised when I received the email about the MVP award.  I had tried to get it the year prior and “focused” on it as a career goal, but when I was promoted to Director of Sales and needed to learn a brand new skill set to help clients, then the idea of “becoming MVP” didn’t seem that important anymore.  At the time, I was traveling to Nonprofit Success Pack sprints, attending & helping at User Groups, however, I could, and meeting folks in person to talk through Salesforce.  I was honored and flattered and have found a brand new group of “co-conspirators” to try new ideas and build up our #Ohana.

What have you been working on?

I’ve had an incredible time developing more friendships with the awesome Women in Technology group in Washington, D.C.   Getting to know MVP Toya Gatewood, MVP Rebecca Lammers, and the User Group Leaders Rakia Finley & LeAndria Streeter has been a privilege and an honor.  As a husband, a father to two daughters, and a peer to some incredible female leaders in technology – I have a lot to learn in how to continue to support women’s voice in our community.

Apart from that, I’m stirring up some “Trailhead oriented” ideas after seeing how many resources are available to lower the learning curve for Users, Admins, and Devs to learn Salesforce more effectively.

When you first got involved in Community?

When I first heard about User Groups from attending a local World Tour, I immediately signed up for the Philadelphia Nonprofit User Group in 2011 or so.  The things I learned there from Dean Graham and a number of the Nonprofit Admins transformed the way I looked at solving Salesforce problems and coming up with solutions.  It also got me hooked – once I started learning better ways to do Salesforce through real people at User Groups and in person, I always wanted to meet with others to compare ideas and learn from each other.

What do you find most challenging after becoming MVP?

It feels a bit like the title and the MVP community offers you access to an entire network of “Ohana capacity” that you can develop your own “MVP path” in how you want to create value and drive people towards learning and development.  I’m looking to choose wisely and invest well with the relationships and people I know.  It’s hard drinking from the “firehose” when it comes to learning Salesforce, but it’s even more exciting to consider how “little old me” from small town Virginia can help folks throughout the Power of Us Hub and the Success Community with their learning.

What can Community Expect from their MVP?

I’ve begun to focus on select meetings with nonprofit Admins when I travel – looking to connect personally, hear their vision for Salesforce at their nonprofit, and help develop their abilities their abilities to do “more good, better” with their CRM and their data.  This has been my “community experience” over the years – especially at Now IT Matters – and I’m looking to have an exponential impact on Salesforce’s 1-1-1 model through investing well in the future.

 

I Hope you liked my blog post as part of the series of articles I am writing called MVP Vibes.

In case you missed the first blog:

In case you missed the second blog:

If you also want to share your experience with Salesforce Community, please contact me.

If you like my Blog, please share it on Facebook and Twitter.

I will be introducing other ambassadors soon and will be sharing their stories too.

 

MVP Vibes


This is my Second blog post as part of the series of articles I am writing called MVP Vibes”. 

MVP Program by Salesforce include so many benefits, where it sounds so awesome, becoming MVP is not that easy, it takes continues contribution in Salesforce Community and real-time efforts.

Salesforce MVP is the one who guides community and recognizes for their Passion, Integrity, Knowledge, Courage, Vision and Awesomeness.

Today I am introducing one of our new WINTER 2017 MVP

Melinda Smith

Salesforce MVP | 5X Certified | Co-host of Two WIT Podcast | Member of #GifSquad

 

Melinda

 

How did you start your Journey?

Admin to a consultant byways of the community. User group lead in So Cal and Two WIT co-host.

 

How do you feel?

I feel honored and privileged to be among so many people that I admire. The community is everything to me in this career. I wouldn’t be where I am without them.

 

What have you been working on?

Working towards Service Cloud then I want the new field service lightning certificate.

 

When you first got involved in Community?

I found the community through my first user group meeting but only really understood the power of the community at the Trailhead Beta kick-off in LA. That’s when I got my first dev org and started asking questions in the community.

 

What do you find most challenging after becoming MVP?

Really the only challenge is time…..there is always so much more I want to do or learn and all the while juggling a career and family.

 

What can Community Expect from their MVP?

I’m helping kick off Salesforce Saturday in Denver. I want to find another non-profit and teach trailhead again. I want to continue to lift other community members up & help newbies see how amazing our Ohana is!

 

If you like my Blog, please share it on Facebook and Twitter.

Soon I will be Introducing other MVPs.

MVP Vibes


This is my first blog post as part of the series of articles I am writing called MVP Vibes”. 

MVP Program by Salesforce include so many benefits, where it sounds so awesome, becoming MVP is not that easy, it takes continues contribution in Salesforce Community and real-time efforts.

Salesforce MVP is the one who guides community and recognizes for their Passion, Integrity, Knowledge, Courage, Vision, and Awesomeness.

Today I am introducing one of our new WINTER 2017 MVP

James Goerke 

MVP | 5X Certified | Leader of Mentorship Central | Co- Leader of Raleigh SFUG

James

How did you start your Journey?

I started my Salesforce Journey in 2008 with Salesforce Support. I actually had no Salesforce experience before joining Salesforce but was able to quickly learn the product and gained experience along the way. Fast forward till 2015 and I moved over to a Salesforce Partner, Vlocity, to start and run their Global Support Team.

How do you feel?

I’m really excited about it. I know it’s an awesome recognition but it doesn’t really change anything for me. I’m still going to be a dedicated community member because that’s what makes me happy.

What have you been working on?

Right now it’s all work all the time! I’ve recently re-launched a new Salesforce Community and we’re looking to launch a new Support Console and Lightning internally.

I’m hoping to make some changes to Mentorship Central to include mentor and mentee training so that the relationships that we connect can start off from a good spot.

When you first got involved in Community?

I think my first community involvement was with the Idea Exchange. I have no idea how many ideas I’ve created over the years but I know it’s a lot. I used the Idea Exchange as a routing tool when I worked with customers. As we all know, Salesforce doesn’t do everything, and we can’t expect it to. So when I was with Salesforce Support and a customer issue would come up that we couldn’t do, I’d create the idea for them. It’s a simple thing but having a tool in place to listen to your customer and allow others to see that seems simple and obvious today but many companies still don’t do it.

What do you find most challenging after becoming MVP?

I can’t say there have been any more challenging situations after becoming an MVP than before. For me, it’s the same. I was a good community member before and I hope to be a good community member in the future. It’s that simple.

What can Community Expect from their MVP?

I’m going to remain dedicated to the Mentorship Central platform I’ve put together. As we go along we’ll continue to gain momentum and continue to connect volunteers together. We’ll hope to have more training released this year and some platform improvements as well.

If you like my Blog, please share it on Facebook and Twitter.

Soon I will be Introducing other MVPs.